“Being HeadSmart” Is Brainy

Children age 14 and under have one of the highest rates of traumatic brain injury.  The active lifestyle of many children – biking, skateboarding, winter sports, team sports, just having fun at the playground or in the yard – increases the potential for concussions or more serious brain injury.

That’s why the Brain Injury Alliance of Utah developed a fun, 30 minute, interactive presentation targeting elementary and middle school children.  During the program the kids learn about the brain and its functions. Through simulations, they experience some of the effects of brain injury.  Kids work to identify potential causes of injury and brainstorm ways to prevent brain injury, such as wearing helmets while biking, or always wearing a seatbelt.

“Being HeadSmart” can be presented to small or large groups, from individual classrooms to school assemblies, and is available to scout groups, 4H and other organizations.  Parents with younger children might consider organizing a parent group to attend a “Being HeadSmart” presentation.

Please contact BIAU staffer Erin at erin@biau.org to schedule a presentation.

 

HeadSmart Blog Posts

Helmets Save Your Brain!

We are excited to be teaming up with Intermountain Healthcare to share the good news about wearing your helmet! Here is information provided by their websites that teaches you how to properly fit a helmet, and common situations that can be the cause of dangerous situations for bicycle riders. For more information please visit their website! To purchase a $5 helmet, click here!   “Wear a helmet every time you lace up your roller blades or climb on your bike, skateboard, or scooter no matter what your age! A helmet only works when you wear it. Set an example by wearing a helmet and encouraging your friends to wear one. Each year, more than 1,200 people die and thousands more are seriously injured in bicycle, roller blade, scooter and skateboard accidents. The most serious accidents involve head injuries. Many of these can be prevented by wearing a safety helmet that fits correctly. Helmet Fittings Be sure your helmet has an ANSI or SNELL label certifying it is safe. Place a snug-fitting helmet on the child’s head. Adjust the helmet straps so the helmet cannot be moved from side to side or back and forth. There should be about one finger width between the chin strap and the child’s chin. Safety Tips Wear a helmet and protective clothing, no matter how slowly you are riding. A fall at any speed can cause a severe head injury. Stop and look both ways for cars before entering the street from a driveway, parking lot or sidewalk. Move with the traffic flow – ride on the right-hand side of the street. Ride single-file...

Spreading Helmets Across the Community

We’re going to be selling bike helmets at select Smith’s locations on Saturdays throughout the month of August, starting this Saturday, August 1.  As part of our effort to increase the number of people, especially kids, wearing helmets we will be at the stores from 10 am to 1 pm. on each of the days and locations.   Wearing helmets reduces the risk of serious head injury by as much as 85%. Stop by! Tell your friends! Purchase a new helmet for yourself, your kids, or your friend’s kids! For $5 you can’t go wrong!! Bike Helmet Sales at Smith’s August 1  South Jordan, 1634 W South Jordan Parkway Logan, 442 N 175 E August 8 West Jordan, 7061 S. Redwood Road Park City, 1725 Uinta Way August 15 Saratoga Springs, 1320 Redwood Road Draper, 212 E 12300 S August 22 West Valley City, 5620 W 4100 S Farmington, 1316 N Highway 89 August 29 Herriman, 5560 W 13400...

Name that Mascot!!

One of the easiest ways to prevent concussions and serious brain injuries is to wear the proper helmet during sports activities like skateboarding, biking, ice skating, skiing, and riding an ATV or scooter. As a matter of fact, wearing a bike helmet reduces the risk of head injury by as much as 85%! That’s why our mascots wear helmets and we need your help to name them. It’s easy! Simply submit your idea to name one or more of our mascots in person, by email (laraine@biau.org) or by regular mail*. The person who submits the winning name for each mascot will receive a family pass for four free admissions to the Tracy Aviary on 589 east and 1300 South, Salt Lake City**.  Click here to...

$5 Bike Helmets Now Available Online

What if wearing a bike helmet could prevent your loved one from experiencing the full force of a bicycle accident, including possible months in the hospital, thousands of dollars in medical expenses, and even death? Protecting Utahans from a devastating brain injury is one of the main focuses of the Brain Injury Alliance of Utah. As a resource facilitator for thousands who have experienced brain injury, BIAU’s team is fully aware of the financial, physical and emotional cost that brain injuries have on families. Executive Director George Gehling explains, “Concussions and other brain injuries can lead to a lifetime of diminished life quality.  Purchasing a bike helmet for only $5 is a small investment to make to potentially prevent a tragedy.” The Brain Injury Alliance of Utah now offers Utah families the opportunity to purchase bicycle helmets for infants, children, teens and adults for just $5 online at www.biau.org. Convenient pick up locations are available throughout Utah, including in Salt Lake County, Davis, Weber, and Cache Counties. “Why are we taking the initiative to offer everyone bike helmets for only $5?” Gehling asks.  “We believe the best way to deal with brain injury is to prevent getting injured in the first place.” This program is part of HeadSmart, an initiative to improve the dialogue and actions that surround head safety. We are working on educating kids and parents the importance of wearing helmets, from the time children are little. Most people feel immune to the effects of those devastating accidents, until it’s them, and they wish they would have simply protected their skull.  Gehling explains, “Bicycle accidents are the...

Being HeadSmart About Bicycle Safety

Being HeadSmart About Bicycle Safety Bicycle accidents are the 3rd highest cause of Traumatic Brain Injury in Utah.  Yet, Utah has no laws requiring helmet use. Although nearly 7 in 10 adults use helmets while biking, use by children is much lower…only 20% for preschoolers, 36.8% for elementary school children and 14.7% for teens. Bicycle helmet use can reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 85%! The Brain Injury Alliance of Utah’s Being HeadSmart program educates children and youth about the brain and why it’s so important to wear a helmet.  The Being HeadSmart presentation is a 30 minute interactive program offered free of charge.  It is adaptable to nearly any group size – large or small – and is available for schools, youth groups, camps, church groups, family gatherings  and other settings.  Contact BIAU at 801-716,4993 or danielle@biau.org for more information and to schedule a presentation. $5 Bicycle Helmets from BIAU! Prevention is the best way to combat the impact of brain injury.  That’s why the Brain Injury Alliance has launched a service providing bicycle helmets for the fantastic price of  $5.  The helmets meet Consumer Product Safety Commission standards and are available in sizes from toddler to adult.  “Helmet use is so important to preventing brain injury that we are offering the helmets at our cost,” noted Director George Gehling.  “Wearing a helmet significantly reduces the risk of a head injury,” noted BIAU associate Adam Bullough.  “Don’t make the mistake I made and ride without a helmet,” Adam continued, referring to his bike accident while riding without a helmet, suffering a head injury.  Helmets...

Concussion? To heal faster, don’t tax your brain

Concussion? To heal faster, don’t tax your brain By: Michelle Healy, USA Today Resting the brain after a concussion — limiting reading, online activities, even homework — can result in quicker recovery, a new study says. In a study of 335 kids and young adults ages 8 to 23, those reporting the most mental activity took the longest to fully recover — 100 days on average. It took 20 to 50 days for patients reporting less cognitive activity, defined in the journal Pediatrics as “activities that require you to think harder than usual.” But “there’s no need to take cognitive rest to the extreme,” such as staying in a dark room, says study co-author William Meehan, director of the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention in Waltham, Mass. Those doing mild cognitive activity did about as well as those with minimal levels. Between 1.7 million and 3 million sports-related concussions occur every year, and half go undetected, says the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Medicine Concussion...