If You Can Talk, You Can Help



The BIAU is fortunate to receive funds from the TBI fund. With these funds, we facilitate miracles. But as of today, not all TBI survivors are taking advantage of these incredible resources simply because they do not know the extent of what we can do for them. Can you help us reach them? There are thousands of Utahns who sustain brain injuries every year, and we want every single one of them to walk through our doors. We can help survivors and their families understand what the doctors don’t often explain. We can direct them to the most needed services. For each resource facilitation appointment we provide, free of charge to the recipient, we receive compensation from the TBI Fund. This enables the BIAU to educate, orient, and support TBI survivors totally free of cost. If they are low income and/or do not have insurance, we can also provide many continuing resources at no charge. For example, a neuropsych evaluation is so important to understanding brain injuries, but they are often very expensive. The TBI Fund allows us to help victims with the costs of these costly, yet vitally important diagnostic procedures. It also covers recovery therapies such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, yoga, and caregiver support. Glenn Lanham, BIAU’s Executive Director, is traveling throughout Utah in order to spread the word about these unbelievable resources. He needs your help. The TBI Fund provides services that are absolutely free for anyone with a brain injury! So, can you help us? 1. Spread the word. If you hear of a fall, an accident, or a hospitalization, take a...

The Easiest Way to Spend 3 Months in Jail: Text & Drive



Texting & Driving Is Deadly Consequences for texting while driving could include 3 months in jail and/or a $750 fine.* If an officer sees you on his phone, he doesn’t need another excuse, he can pull you over and ticket you. Texting while driving is classified as a misdemeanor. 13.5% of all TBI incidences are results of motor vehicle accidents.** These strict Utah phone use laws are a major effort to prevent traumatic brain injuries. In this law’s first year, over 1,600 texters were pulled over and 126 crashes were a result of phone use.*** TBI Also Caused From Falls Though we often think of car accidents when we talk about TBIs, a surprising 46.7% of traumatic brain injuries are results of falls.** The state may not have any laws about prevention in this area, but there are some things you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones from these kinds of TBIs: • Exercise helps you maintain good balance and strength. • Removing clutter that could cause a fall. Remember, prevention is a personal decision. Will you commit to avert TBIs by not using your phone when driving? Will you help yourself and your family avoid falls by keeping walkways clear of clutter? Do your part to protect. *http://www.drivinglaws.org/utah.php **http://www.health.utah.gov/vipp/topics/traumatic-brain-injury/...

Utah’s TBI Fund: From Capitol Hill to Actualization

Utah’s TBI Fund: From Capitol Hill to Actualization

Some of the most advantageous resources available for TBI survivors in Utah are made possible through the legislative TBI Fund. A person with a TBI can come to BIAU for free resource facilitation and be directed to receive needed services such as a neuro-psychological assessment. The Fund also educates professionals and the public and makes support more accessible for TBI survivors and their families. Utah’s Department of Health published a Legislative Report that declared, “For every $1 spent of the TBI Fund, clients were able to obtain $1.42 in much-needed services that would not have been received otherwise.” This means thousands of those in need are receiving the help that they need, thanks to the fund and other generous providers. Advocates of brain injury are eager to reach more people with the great news of the opportunities available through the TBI Fund. In 2016, The TBI Fund spent a total of $200,000 with an extra $56,649 in matches from other sources.   2016 TBI Fund Accomplishments: • 232 clients received intake assessments with 130 qualifying for TBI resource facilitation services. • 130 clients with a TBI received one-to-one resource facilitation services. • 40 clients received a neuro-psychological assessment to clarify the needed services that would be most beneficial. • 121 of the 130 participants who received resource facilitation services were in need of and have been connected to ongoing services.   Access requirements to the TBI Fund include: • Be a resident of Utah • Be diagnosed with a TBI • Have exhausted other financial resources • Not be aiming to use the funds for treatment or rehab care...

New Data on TBI-Related ED Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths

New Data on TBI-Related ED Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month and CDC’s Injury Center encourages you to continue spreading the word about ways to prevent a traumatic brain injury (TBI) to help protect the health of all Americans. To highlight this important issue, CDC published a new MMWR Surveillance Summary titled Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths—United States, 2007 and 2013. CDC analyzed the latest data and reported results on the leading causes of TBI by age group and sex. The data show that in 2013, there were: 2.5 million emergency department (ED) visits, 282,000 hospitalizations, and 56,000 deaths related to TBI. The most common causes of TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths were falls, being struck by or against an object, and motor vehicle crashes. In addition, from 2007 to 2013, the number of TBIs due to falls among older adults increased significantly. ED visits more than doubled, hospitalizations went up by half, and deaths rose by a third. This across-the-board increase illustrates the critical need to help older Americans prevent falls and protect their health and their...

President Obama Applauds Commitment to Address Sports-Related Concussions In Young People

President Obama Applauds Commitment to Address Sports-Related Concussions In Young People

Sports are one of the best ways to keep our kids active and healthy, but young people make nearly 250,000 emergency room visits each year with sport or recreation-related brain injuries. As a sports fan and a parent with two young daughters, President Obama believes we need to do more to protect the health and safety of our kids. On May 29, 2014, the President hosted the first-ever White House Healthy Kids & Safe Sports Concussion Summit to advance research on sports-related youth concussions and raise awareness of steps to prevent, identify and respond to concussions in young people. The summit brought together key stakeholders to highlight new commitments, including private-public partnerships, to increase research that will expand our knowledge of concussions to provide parents, coaches, clinicians, and young athletes tools to better prevent, identify and respond to concussions. Staying Active and Playing Safe Each day, hundreds of thousands of young athletes head out to fields, ice rinks and gymnasiums to practice and compete in a wide variety of sports. There is no doubt that sports are a great way for kids and teens to stay healthy, as well as to learn important leadership and team-building skills. At the same time, parents are increasingly concerned about the role of concussions in sports. Concussions can have a serious effect on young, developing brains, and can cause short- and long-term problems affecting how a child thinks, acts, learns, and feels. While most kids and teens with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks, and a more serious concussion can last longer....

Brain training boosted older adults’ mental skills



Written by Catharine Paddock PhD Researchers found that giving a group of older adults a brief course of mental or cognitive training helped to improve their reasoning ability and processing speed, and hold onto the gains for up to 10 years, compared with a group of untrained controls. Plus, those who received additional training for another 3 years improved even further. Cognitive decline is not uncommon among older adults and can seriously affect their ability to lead a normal life and carry out everyday tasks. Study leader George Rebok, a professor at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, and an expert on aging and mental health, says: “Showing that training gains are maintained for up to 10 years is a stunning result because it suggests that a fairly modest intervention in practicing mental skills can have relatively long-term effects beyond what we might reasonably expect.” He and his colleagues also found the seniors who received the brief cognitive training also reported experiencing less difficulty in carrying out everyday living tasks. Prof. Rebok says even small delays in impairment of mental and functional ability can have a big effect on public health and help reduce the rising cost of caring for older adults. They report their findings in a soon-to-be-published issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Seniors received training in memory, reasoning and processing speed skills The results come from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study, which tested whether cognitive training sessions could help older adults maintain functional independence by improving basic mental skills. This latest analysis is of 10 years of...