March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

March is Brain Injury Awareness month! See below for event details!   Brain injuries can have a dramatic impact on a person’s ability to lead an active, fulfilling life. • Every day in Utah, 68 people are treated in an emergency department for a TBI, six people are hospitalized, and one person dies from a TBI. • Falls (52%) were the leading cause of TBI hospitalizations in Utah, followed by transportation realted causes (24%) and sports or recreation activities (21%). • TBI hospitalization rates increase with age; older adults aged 75+ have the highest rates of TBIs. • TBIs resulted in nearly $95 million in hospitalization charges in Utah in 2013; a 10.5% increase from $86 million in 2011. This does not include costs for disability and long-term care, or lost wages. • The age-adjusted rate of TBI hospitalizations had a statistically significant increase from 2011 (816 per 100,000 population) to 2013 (826 per 100,000 population). • The Utah State Legislature established a TBI Fund in 2008. The funds are used to: 1) educate Utahns on TBI treatment and prevention; 2) provide evaluations and assistance in identifying services and resources needed by persons with a TBI for which they may be eligible; and 3) develop an information referral system for persons with a TBI and their families. • Wear a helmet when riding an off-highway vehicle, bicycle, skateboard, or scooter; playing a contact sport, such as football, ice hockey, or boxing; using inline skates or riding a skateboard; batting and running bases in baseball or softball; riding a horse; or skiing or snowboarding. • Ask your league, school, or...

Brain Injury Awareness Purple Thursdays

Brain Injury Awareness Purple Thursdays

Brain Injury Alliance of Utah and the United States Brain Injury Alliance promoting brain injury awareness through “Purple Thursdays” The Brain Injury Alliance of Utah is joining USBIA affiliates from 17 states to promote Purple Thursdays during Brain Injury Awareness Month in March. The campaign is designed to shine a spotlight on traumatic brain injury, often referred to as “the silent epidemic.” The Utah invites anyone touched by brain injury to wear something purple on any or all of the five Thursdays in March to show support for those affected by brain injury in (your state), the families that love them, and the professionals who care for them. People wearing purple are then invited to share their support by sending a photos of themselves or their group to the Utah. The Utah will use the pictures to spread awareness by posting them on its web site and via social media. “Nobody thinks about a traumatic brain injury until it happens to them or someone they love,” said (state affiliate official and title). “At the Utah we work with hundreds of individuals and families whose lives have been upended by TBI, and many times they had never heard of brain injury before it hit home. We’ve launched Purple Thursdays as a way to raise general TBI awareness and also encourage prevention and overall brain health.” It is estimated every 13.1 seconds, one person in the United State sustains a traumatic brain injury. The most common causes of TBI are falls, motor vehicle accidents, unintended collisions and assaults. Common symptoms of brain injury can include memory loss, headaches, anxiety, anger and...

Introducing Conference Keynote Speaker, Dr. Adam Schwebach

Introducing Conference Keynote Speaker, Dr. Adam Schwebach

Dr. Adam Schwebach doesn’t only have years of involvement in neuroscientific study and lists of titles and achievements for excellence in that field; he also has deep personal motivation and a heart of empathy when working with survivors of brain injury and their families. After a motor vehicle accident, Schwebach’s mother wasn’t quite the same. She began to suffer from a seizure disorder and struggled with this challenge from the time Schwebach was just a young child. Despite her vibrancy and tenacity, she also experienced ongoing mental health issues, including anxiety. As she has aged, her cognitive setbacks have become even more significant. For Schwebach, these challenges were just part of life. That changed, however, when he enrolled in a neuropsychology course during his undergrad. “My eyes were opened to how the brain works. This really helped me to better understand what my mother was going through and more importantly,” he emphasized, “ways that I could help her overcome some of [her] challenges.” His passion was ignited and it has never stopped flaring. From that point forward, Schwebach has dedicated his career to studies that have changed the lives of many brain injury survivors and their families. His extensive research has illuminated him as a leader in the field of cognitive-related studies and he currently serves as the director of the Neuropsychology Center of Utah. He has been presenting at professional conferences since 2004 and has published 12 peer reviewed articles and book chapters. His merit in the field is widely recognized. Despite his significant distinctions and exceptional accomplishments, he has not forgotten his experiences in a family of...

Protection from Concussions Begins Long Before the First Whistle is Blown

Protection from Concussions Begins Long Before the First Whistle is Blown

School has started, and that means sports; football, soccer, and more! Sports helps teach your children valuable lessons about self-discipline, teamwork, and fitness. However, you have also probably either seen them get injured, or imagined a broken leg as a sweaty group of athletes pile on you kid. 250,000 young people visit the emergency room each year in the United States* because of sport or recreation-related brain injuries, and this represents only a small portion of total concussions. Left untreated, concussions can have devastating results, including; Learning and Concentration Difficulties Depression Disturbed sleep Memory loss Seizures Early Diagnosis of Alzheimers and Parkinsons Cerebral bleeding (often fatal) This is what you can do to protect your children: #1: Help Your Kids Understand the Significance of Concussions In many High School sports, the amount of concussions a player has received is flaunted as a testament to their toughness and stamina. What those players do not understand is that the more concussions they receive, the more likely they are to suffer from severe and devastating symptoms in the years to come. Discuss with your children the impacts of brain injury. Explain what could happen if they fail to play with proper padding. The movie Concussion  may be a great conversation starter with older children. #2: Learn to recognize concussion symptoms and Do NOT Return to Game Play Many young athletes, and unfortunately, some coaches and parents, prioritize the game above health. After an injury, players assure their coaches they are fine so they can get more playing time. Review with your children the indications of a concussion and emphasize what they are...